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Idiom of the Week - Week 41

Each week of 2017 we present an English idiom.

"to have (something) up (one's) sleeve": to have a plan or an idea one hasn't told anyone about yet

Example 1:  His comments during the meeting made me wonder what he had up his sleeve.

Example 2:Lesen Sie hier weiter

Idiom of the Week - Week 40

Each week of 2017 we present an English idiom.

"rule of thumb": a general guideline or principle; Faustregel

Example 1:  Many people believe that being yourself is the best rule of thumb for most situations.

Example 2:  Do you agree with Monster.com's rule of thumb Lesen Sie hier weiter

Idiom of the Week - Week 39

Each week of 2017 we present an English idiom.

"to call the shots": to make the decisions; das Sagen haben

Example 1:  The manager is out on sick leave, so Mike, the project manager, is calling all the shots at the moment.

Example 2:  The CEO calls the shots, but she always consults with her management team about major decisions.

In the news:Lesen Sie hier weiter

Idiom of the Week - Week 38

Each week of 2017 we present an English idiom.

"to go back to the drawing board": to start again from the beginning; noch einmal von vorn anfangen

Example 1:  The package design wasn't quite what we were looking for, so we've asked the designer to go back to the drawing board and send us some new proposals.

Example 2:Lesen Sie hier weiter

Idiom of the Week - Week 37

Each week of 2017 we present an English idiom.

"to go to bat for somebody": to support or help someone; für jdn./etw. eine Lanze brechen
This idiom comes from the sport of baseball. Learn the basic rules of the game.

Example 1:  Because she believed my proposal would be successful, she went to bat for me during the management committee meeting.

Example 2:Lesen Sie hier weiter

Idiom of the Week - Week 36

Each week of 2017 we present an English idiom.

"hold your horses": slow down; he, nun mal langsam, nicht so schnell!

Example 1:  Hold your horses. Who said we're opening a new store in February?

Example 2:  Even if you're eager to share your ideas at your new job, you might want to hold your horses until you've learned the ropesLesen Sie hier weiter

Idiom of the Week - Week 35

Each week of 2017 we present an English idiom.

"to stick it out": to continue to the end of a situation that is difficult or unenjoyable (especially in AE); bis (zum Ende) durchhalten

Example 1:  The secondment ends in two months. Surely you can stick it out until then.

Example 2:Lesen Sie hier weiter

Idiom of the Week - Week 33

Each week of 2017 we present an English idiom.

"a pain in the neck": something or someone that is frustrating or difficult to deal with; Nervensäge, ein Krampf sein, ein Dorn im Auge sein

Example 1:  Dealing with travel expenses following a business trip is always a pain in the neck.

Example 2:Lesen Sie hier weiter

Idiom of the Week - Week 32

Each week of 2017 we present an English idiom.

"to get/start the ball rolling": to begin something such as a task, project or discussion; den Ball ins Rollen bringen

Example 1:  We need to get the ball rolling on the IT project as soon as possible.

Example 2:Lesen Sie hier weiter