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Idiom of the Week - Week 49

Each week of 2017 we present an English idiom.

"to be out of the woods":  to be safe from danger or difficulty; noch nicht über den Berg sein; noch nicht aus dem Schneider sein

Example 1:  The fusion went rather well. We seem to be out of the woods.

Example 2:  We're not quite out of the woods yet. We still have some important terms to negotiate.

In the news:Lesen Sie hier weiter

Idiom of the Week - Week 48

Each week of 2017 we present an English idiom.

"to jump start":  to take action to improve a situation; etw. wieder in Gang bringen

Example 1:  The government is trying to jump start the economy by lowering interest rates.

Example 2:  A big cup of coffee in the morning always jump starts my day.

In the news:Lesen Sie hier weiter

Idiom of the Week - Week 47

Each week of 2017 we present an English idiom.

"to be on the fence": to be undecided; s. nicht entscheiden können

Example 1:  I'm on the fence about the designer's suggestions for the new logo. On the one hand I like this one, but I like that one too.

Example 2:Lesen Sie hier weiter

Idiom of the Week - Week 46

Each week of 2017 we present an English idiom.

"to cut (somebody) some slack": to be lenient or not strict with somebody; mit jdm nachsichtig sein

Example 1:  We should cut him some slack. After all, he just starting working here a few weeks ago and probably didn't know about the policy.

Example 2:Lesen Sie hier weiter

Idiom of the Week - Week 45

Each week of 2017 we present an English idiom.

"to give (someone) a hand": to help (someone)

Example 1:  Could you give me a hand with the letter I've been working on?

Example 2:Lesen Sie hier weiter

Idiom of the Week - Week 44

Each week of 2017 we present an English idiom.

"to have a lot on (one's) plate": to have a lot to do; viel zu tun haben

Example 1:  You could ask Frank to help you, but I think he's got a lot on his plate at the moment.

Example 2:Lesen Sie hier weiter

Idiom of the Week - Week 43

Each week of 2017 we present an English idiom.

"to get (one's) wires crossed": to have a different understanding of the same thing, a misunderstanding; s. falsch verstehen, einander vorbeireden

Tip: Always use a plural pronoun, i.e. "we", "you (two)", "they". One person can't get his or her wires crossed.

Example 1:  Lesen Sie hier weiter

Idiom of the Week - Week 42

Each week of 2017 we present an English idiom.

"to bark up the wrong tree": to be wrong about the reason for something or the way to get something done; auf dem Holzweg sein

Example 1:  I'm afraid we're barking up the wrong tree if our aim is to reach Millennials.

Example 2:Lesen Sie hier weiter

Idiom of the Week - Week 41

Each week of 2017 we present an English idiom.

"to have (something) up (one's) sleeve": to have a plan or an idea one hasn't told anyone about yet

Example 1:  His comments during the meeting made me wonder what he had up his sleeve.

Example 2:Lesen Sie hier weiter

Idiom of the Week - Week 40

Each week of 2017 we present an English idiom.

"rule of thumb": a general guideline or principle; Faustregel

Example 1:  Many people believe that being yourself is the best rule of thumb for most situations.

Example 2:  Do you agree with Monster.com's rule of thumb Lesen Sie hier weiter